Saturday, February 15, 2020

Conflicting Situation at Work Term Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

Conflicting Situation at Work - Term Paper Example The need is to understand where it has crept up from and what related measures could be taken to avoid it in the first place (Boles, 2011). One such conflicting situation came about when recently one of the employees had a rift with his boss. This problem caused the entire department to lose focus for quite a while. Indeed this was getting into something big until the top management realized the gravity of the situation and intervened to bring to an end the entire issue. The amicable solution was found through understanding and logic which prevailed in entirety. The need was to discern where the two employees were doing just too much pushing and pulling, which was unthinkable on the part of the other employees and the management in essence. There was an air of suspicion which existed within the realms of these two employees who were not even on the same level. The conflicting situation came about when the boss ordered his subordinate to comply with his orders time and again. The subo rdinate did not agree with what the boss had to suggest and carried on with his own undertakings and tasks in the office. The result was very serious as it turned out to be. The two of them got into an argument and started to abuse one another for doing nothing all day long. The boss was surprised that the subordinate had the guts in him to get up to him and speak out loud and that too in front of just about everyone in the office. The actions that the management took under such settings were of dire consequence as it had to intercept within this quagmire which had developed with the passage of time. The senior bosses called these two employees who were essentially boss and subordinate, and thus worked in the same department. They were asked to give their side of the story and thus tell who of the two was wrong amongst them. It was obvious that both of them hurled claims on the other party to be labeled as the guilty one. This ended up in stalemate and both were ordered to leave the office within the shortest time since they were sentenced to two weeks suspensions. The problem was made bigger than it was in the beginning. The subordinate was very abusive and used to hurl slang language and jokes on the boss and the boss had found this out through other employees. The boss was also adamant that since he was senior to the subordinate, his say should have been more important. My perception was that this situation was not handled properly right from the onset. It meant that the employees were not being managed adequately well by the management domains. The need of the hour was such that the employees should have been apprised of the consequences before they indulged into one such rift. Their attitudes would have been better had they known what was in store for them and how they had to handle things in a proper manner. Sadly, this did not come about as such and there were problems for both of them as well as the employees who worked with them or around them in one or the other capacity. I believe that the boss would have let the human resource management department handle things on their own since this would have been the better thing to do in such a scenario. It would have served the cause of the two and taken into consideration the abuse factor which was raised by the subordinate that was simply unwanted and uncalled for (Harrison, 2006).  

Sunday, February 2, 2020

How you would attempt to keep a business from suffering a similar Essay

How you would attempt to keep a business from suffering a similar attack - Essay Example Key words Packet attack; juveniles; distributed denial of service (DDoS) What was Learned There is a lot that I have learned from the attack on grc.com. First of all, this attack was carried out by a 13 year old! He mentioned that together with his friends, he decided to attack the website following a â€Å"disparaging† remark that was made by the website in its newsgroup. Let me go back to my point. The logic here is not whether the attack was carried out by a group or an individual, but that a 13 year old was at the mastermind of the attack and even bragged about it. What I learned from this is that â€Å"internet terrorism† is no longer a preserve of college students or people aged 16 and above (as previously thought). Maybe the 13 year old kid and his friends are very good at computers, but that is also beside the point. The fact that they took time to learn how to design and launch packet attacks is very worrying indeed and must be looked into. Overall, what I lear ned from this is that there is a new breed of hackers in town. These new breed is aggressive, smart and, surprisingly, unapologetic. This calls for a revision of cyber terrorism combat strategies and techniques. What is also clear from the attack is that law enforcement agencies and authorities are not only ill-prepared but also poorly augmented to deal with the new class of hackers. For instance, the author reveals that when he approached the FBI after establishing that the individual who masterminded the attack was a 13 year old, he was met with the following responses: a) Until the damages done amounted to $5,000, no crime had been committed. That is the law. b) Even if the damages done amounted to $5,000 and a crime was deemed to have been committed, their staffs were not only swamped but also overloaded with cases concerning firms that had incurred huge monetary losses caused by internet/cyber crime. c) Considering that the chief suspect was just 13 years old, there was not muc h that could be done to him, even if the amount of evidence confirmed that the attacks were planned and orchestrated by him. The most that could happen was a chat between some agents and his parents at his place of residence. In essence, his youth gave him an impenetrable armor. This was a major discouragement of the costs likely to be incurred from any kind of investigation. These points prove my earlier assertion that law enforcement authorities and agencies (in this case the FBI) are not only ill-equipped but also poorly augmented to fight cybercrime that is perpetrated by juveniles. How I would Attempt to keep a Business from Suffering a similar Attack I would institute a number of effective measures to combat attacks similar to the one that was directed at grc.com. These measures include the following: Developing effective commands that will counter the possibility of suffering a similar attack. This will work by helping businesses verify that their systems are not infected by any of the existing IRC Zombie/Bots. Since all the IRC Zombie/Bots usually trigger and maintain static links to remote IRC chat servers anytime the host computer is connected to the internet (Yang & Wanlei 22). An active link/connection can be detected using the following command; netstat –an | find â€Å":6667†. Detection will pave way for termination. Encouraging businesses and firms to perform regular tests and checks that allow them to detect and consequently terminate harmful connections. Since IRC

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Cocaine :: Illegal Drugs Narcotics Papers

Cocaine Cocaine is a drug derived from the leaf of the Erytroxylon cocoa bush, which grows primarily in Peru and Bolivia. Cocaine also known as coke, C, snow, flake, nose candy, blow, or crack is generally sold on the street as a hydrochloride salt( a water-soluble salt). Cocaine is a fine, white crystalline powder often diluted with similar-looking substances such as talcum powder, sugar, or amphetamines. The powder can be snorted into the nostrils, also may be rubbed onto the mucous linings of the mouth, rectum, or vagina. To experience cocaine's effects quickly, and to heighten their intensity, users sometimes dissolve it in water and injects into a vein. The drug may be smoked in a purified form through a water pipe (freebassing) or in a concentrated form (crack) shaped into pellets or rocks and placed in special smoking gear. Despite today's abuse of the highly addictive drug, cocaine was intended for medical purposes. Pure cocaine was first extracted and identified by the German chemis t Albert Niemann in the mid-19thcentury, and was introduced as a tonic/elixir in patent medicines to treat a variety of real or imagined illnesses. Later, it was used as a local anesthetic for eye, ear, and throat surgery and continues today to have limited use in surgery. Cocaine is a powerful central nervous system stimulant that heightens alertness and provides intense feelings of pleasure. Because of it's potent euphoric and energizing effects, many people in the late 19th century took cocaine, even though some physicians recognized that users quickly became dependent. In the 1880s, the psychiatrist Sigmund Freud created a sensation with a series of papers praising cocaine=s potential to cure depression, alcoholism, and morphine addiction. Skepticism soon replaced this excitement, however, when documented reports of fatal cocaine poisoning, alarming mental disturbances, and cocaine addiction began to circulate. In 1902, ninety two percent of all cocaine sold in major cities in the United States was in the form of an ingredient in tonics and potions available from local pharmacies. In 1911, the Canadian government legally restricted cocaine use, and its popularity decreased. The 1920s and 1930s saw a decline in its use, especially after amphetamines became easily available. Cocaine=s popular return beginning in the late 1960s, coincided with the decreased use of amphetamines. Along with the feelings of pleasure comes negative effects. The effects of any drug depend on the amounts taken at one time, the user=s past drug experience, the manner in which the drug is taken, and the circumstances under which the drug is taken.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Humor in American Literature Essay

American society is unique, and the first of its kind. When Charles Dickens visited the United States he was astounded to see how informal American society was, as is recorded in his travelogue, American Notes For General Circulation. Besides this, it is often said by non-Americans that Americans have coarse senses of humor, or senses of humor that are low-class. The American sense of humor is said to clash with a polarized British one. The informality of American humor is utterly logical based on a theory that American society developed in response to Old-World British and European society. This theme often manifests itself in humorous American literature. Humor in American literature frequently bases itself on a sense of entitlement within the lower class, their flawed and ignorant moral senses, and a caricaturing of American exceptionalism, a theory of American superiority among other nations. American humor hasn’t changed extremely, but rather has maintained the common denominator of the humor of American exceptionalism and has parodied a feeling of individual self-worth that is seemingly intrinsic to Americans of all classes. This subject matter can be found in such works as Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Sut Lovingood: Yarns Spun by a â€Å"Nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool†, by George Washington Harris, and Stephen Colbert’s I am America (and So Can You). Most of George Washington Harris’s work was done in the middle of the nineteenth century. His most famous character is the stereotypical rural farmer, Sut Lovingood. Harris’s Sut Lovingood stories were told from the character’s perspective and were defined by Sut’s heavy â€Å"Appalachian English† accent. His stories were initially published separately in multiple newspapers until Harris compiled the stories in his 1867 book Sut Lovingood: Yarns Spun by a â€Å"Nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool. The book mostly pokes fun at the ignorance and simplicity of the title character. Sut Lovingood dictates the book to a writer. He is unable to write it himself because he is illiterate. He is uneasy about this though. Sut says: â€Å"I don’t like the idear ove yu writin a perduckshun, an’ me a-findin the brains.† (Harris 2) Sut is an immensely simple character, but does not see himself as such. He thinks he has important things to say and that anyone who doesn’t read his book will simply be worse-off for having done so, but in reality his stories mostly consist of folderol. Sut states that he wanted his dedication page to read as such: â€Å"Dedercated wif the symperhtys ove the orthur, to the man ur ‘oman, huever they be, what don’t read this yere book.† (Harris 5) Despite his coming after George Washington Harris, Mark Twain is often hailed as the father of American Humor. Twain’s tales of life on the Mississippi River became the definitive stories of his era. His stories are often about naivetà © and the innocence of childhood, on a superficial level , but on a deeper level they are about ignorance and other shortcomings of adults. Twain’s stories were simultaneously entertaining and critical of society. One of his most famous works of this classification is The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Tom Sawyer is set in a small Missouri town, where the standards for luxury are quite low, and the people easily impressed. The townspeople are awed by the county-Judge Thatcher, a relatively low figure in the governmental hierarchy. When he pays a visit to the town church everyone there bends over backwards to â€Å"show off† and impress him (Twain 38). The people are especially impressed by the fact that there exists a tin roof atop one of the buildings in Judge Thatcher’s town. Tom Sawyer’s Aunt Polly is an excellent caricature of American humor. Despite being the voice of discipline in Tom’s life, Aunt Polly is constantly being fooled by the boy. Among the most well known of the Tom Sawyer stories is the anecdote about doing the chore of whitewashing a fence. Because of his indolent nature, Tom cozens his peers into completing his task for him, unbeknownst to his aunt. After Tom returns from his supposed labor after only a short time, Polly commends him saying, â€Å"Well, I never! There’s no getting round it, you can work when you’re a mind to, Tom†. And she goes on to give Tom a â€Å"lecture upon the added value and flavor a treat took to itself when it came without sin through virtuous effort. And while she closed with a scriptural flourish, he ‘hooked’ a doughnut.† (Twain 26) Not only is Tom able to totally fool his aunt, but he is confident enough in her incompetence that he even snatches an additional snack. She and all of the adults in the story go on to fall for Tom’s wiles on numerous occasions. The more modern Stephen Colbert wrote a book entitled I Am America (and So Can You), which bears many similarities to George Washington Harris’s book. Colbert’s work is written from the character on his satirical news show’s extremely traditional, right wing perspective. He spoofs the idea of a traditional American family, going so far as to say that anything falling short of his expectations is simply wrong. He remarks on the role of a good, traditional mother: â€Å"A good mother cooks, cleans, drives, organizes charity events so her children earn community service points for college, and expects nothing in return except love and breakfast in bed one day a year.† (Colbert 9), and he lambasts the idea of one-parent families saying, â€Å"â€Å"If you ask me, from time immemorial, the word ‘family’ has meant only one thing: a Mom married to a Pop and raising 2.3 rambunctious little scamps.† (Colbert 5) Colbert is joking of course, but his implications are that the traditional American standards have room for adjustment and that many conservative Americans are overly hidebound. He goes on to lampoon the institution of religion. â€Å"Religion is the cornerstone of civilization. Without it, we would have no laws, no morality, no social structure, and no guidelines for furnishing our tabernacles.† Many people have tried to pinpoint exactly what it is so distinctive between American and British humor. British comedian Simon Pegg wrote about in the UK Guardian in his 2007 article, â€Å"What Are You Laughing At?†: Americans can fully appreciate irony. They just don’t feel entirely comfortable using it on each other, in case it causes damage. A bit like how we feel about guns. It’s not so much about having a different sense of humour as a different approach to life. More demonstrative than we are, Americans are not embarrassed by their emotions. They clap louder, cheer harder and empathise more unconditionally. It’s an openness that always leaves me feeling slightly guilty and apologetic when American personalities appear on British chat shows and find their jokes and stories met with titters, not guffaws, or their achievements met with silent appreciation, rather than claps and yelps. We don’t like them any less, we just aren’t inclined to give that much of ourselves away. Meanwhile, as a Brit on an American chat show, it’s difficult to endure prolonged whooping without intense, red-faced smirking. It isn’t that one culture is funnier per se, just that comparing the two would be like comparing apples and oranges. In former Vanderbilt English professor Nancy A. Walker’s book, What’s So Funny? Humor in American Culture, Walker expounds upon the origin of the distinctive American â€Å"tall tale†, citing the American pioneers of the Western frontier who would write back to the East Coast telling tales of exaggeration in an attempt to impress the readers of their tales. Edward J. Piacentino wrote that the purview of classic American humor still reaches us through mediums such as The Beverly Hillbillies, or the work of comedian Jeff Foxworthy. America’s unique face of humor stems from multiple factors of American history. Firstly, American humor developed intentionally and in stark contrast to that of the British, just like much of American society. Because of the revolutionary nature of the founding of America, certain values have been instilled in the country’s inhabitants. American culture developed as a volte-face from British culture. Additionally, as Walker presented, the development of American humor and exaggerated â€Å"tall-tales† derives from the geography of the country and the frontier development of it. Those elements of the country’s history laid the groundwork for the America that we know today. That is why we still have much of the same face of humor in America after all these years. Works Cited Colbert, Stephen, and Michael C. Brumm. I Am America (and so Can You!). [New York]: Grand Central Pub., 2007. Print. Harris, George Washington. Sut Lovingood. Yarns Spun by a â€Å"nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool.† Warped and Wove for Public Wear. New York: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1867. Print. Pegg, Simon. â€Å"What Are You Laughing At?† The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 02 Sept. 2007. Web. 08 Nov. 2012. Piacentino, Edward J. The Enduring Legacy of Old Southwest Humor. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2006. Print. Twain, Mark, and Deidre S. Laiken. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York, NY: Baronet /Playmore, 1989. Print. Walker, Nancy A. What’s so Funny?: Humor in American Culture. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998. Print.

Humor in American Literature Essay

American society is unique, and the first of its kind. When Charles Dickens visited the United States he was astounded to see how informal American society was, as is recorded in his travelogue, American Notes For General Circulation. Besides this, it is often said by non-Americans that Americans have coarse senses of humor, or senses of humor that are low-class. The American sense of humor is said to clash with a polarized British one. The informality of American humor is utterly logical based on a theory that American society developed in response to Old-World British and European society. This theme often manifests itself in humorous American literature. Humor in American literature frequently bases itself on a sense of entitlement within the lower class, their flawed and ignorant moral senses, and a caricaturing of American exceptionalism, a theory of American superiority among other nations. American humor hasn’t changed extremely, but rather has maintained the common denominator of the humor of American exceptionalism and has parodied a feeling of individual self-worth that is seemingly intrinsic to Americans of all classes. This subject matter can be found in such works as Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Sut Lovingood: Yarns Spun by a â€Å"Nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool†, by George Washington Harris, and Stephen Colbert’s I am America (and So Can You). Most of George Washington Harris’s work was done in the middle of the nineteenth century. His most famous character is the stereotypical rural farmer, Sut Lovingood. Harris’s Sut Lovingood stories were told from the character’s perspective and were defined by Sut’s heavy â€Å"Appalachian English† accent. His stories were initially published separately in multiple newspapers until Harris compiled the stories in his 1867 book Sut Lovingood: Yarns Spun by a â€Å"Nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool. The book mostly pokes fun at the ignorance and simplicity of the title character. Sut Lovingood dictates the book to a writer. He is unable to write it himself because he is illiterate. He is uneasy about this though. Sut says: â€Å"I don’t like the idear ove yu writin a perduckshun, an’ me a-findin the brains.† (Harris 2) Sut is an immensely simple character, but does not see himself as such. He thinks he has important things to say and that anyone who doesn’t read his book will simply be worse-off for having done so, but in reality his stories mostly consist of folderol. Sut states that he wanted his dedication page to read as such: â€Å"Dedercated wif the symperhtys ove the orthur, to the man ur ‘oman, huever they be, what don’t read this yere book.† (Harris 5) Despite his coming after George Washington Harris, Mark Twain is often hailed as the father of American Humor. Twain’s tales of life on the Mississippi River became the definitive stories of his era. His stories are often about naivetà © and the innocence of childhood, on a superficial level , but on a deeper level they are about ignorance and other shortcomings of adults. Twain’s stories were simultaneously entertaining and critical of society. One of his most famous works of this classification is The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Tom Sawyer is set in a small Missouri town, where the standards for luxury are quite low, and the people easily impressed. The townspeople are awed by the county-Judge Thatcher, a relatively low figure in the governmental hierarchy. When he pays a visit to the town church everyone there bends over backwards to â€Å"show off† and impress him (Twain 38). The people are especially impressed by the fact that there exists a tin roof atop one of the buildings in Judge Thatcher’s town. Tom Sawyer’s Aunt Polly is an excellent caricature of American humor. Despite being the voice of discipline in Tom’s life, Aunt Polly is constantly being fooled by the boy. Among the most well known of the Tom Sawyer stories is the anecdote about doing the chore of whitewashing a fence. Because of his indolent nature, Tom cozens his peers into completing his task for him, unbeknownst to his aunt. After Tom returns from his supposed labor after only a short time, Polly commends him saying, â€Å"Well, I never! There’s no getting round it, you can work when you’re a mind to, Tom†. And she goes on to give Tom a â€Å"lecture upon the added value and flavor a treat took to itself when it came without sin through virtuous effort. And while she closed with a scriptural flourish, he ‘hooked’ a doughnut.† (Twain 26) Not only is Tom able to totally fool his aunt, but he is confident enough in her incompetence that he even snatches an additional snack. She and all of the adults in the story go on to fall for Tom’s wiles on numerous occasions. The more modern Stephen Colbert wrote a book entitled I Am America (and So Can You), which bears many similarities to George Washington Harris’s book. Colbert’s work is written from the character on his satirical news show’s extremely traditional, right wing perspective. He spoofs the idea of a traditional American family, going so far as to say that anything falling short of his expectations is simply wrong. He remarks on the role of a good, traditional mother: â€Å"A good mother cooks, cleans, drives, organizes charity events so her children earn community service points for college, and expects nothing in return except love and breakfast in bed one day a year.† (Colbert 9), and he lambasts the idea of one-parent families saying, â€Å"â€Å"If you ask me, from time immemorial, the word ‘family’ has meant only one thing: a Mom married to a Pop and raising 2.3 rambunctious little scamps.† (Colbert 5) Colbert is joking of course, but his implications are that the traditional American standards have room for adjustment and that many conservative Americans are overly hidebound. He goes on to lampoon the institution of religion. â€Å"Religion is the cornerstone of civilization. Without it, we would have no laws, no morality, no social structure, and no guidelines for furnishing our tabernacles.† Many people have tried to pinpoint exactly what it is so distinctive between American and British humor. British comedian Simon Pegg wrote about in the UK Guardian in his 2007 article, â€Å"What Are You Laughing At?†: Americans can fully appreciate irony. They just don’t feel entirely comfortable using it on each other, in case it causes damage. A bit like how we feel about guns. It’s not so much about having a different sense of humour as a different approach to life. More demonstrative than we are, Americans are not embarrassed by their emotions. They clap louder, cheer harder and empathise more unconditionally. It’s an openness that always leaves me feeling slightly guilty and apologetic when American personalities appear on British chat shows and find their jokes and stories met with titters, not guffaws, or their achievements met with silent appreciation, rather than claps and yelps. We don’t like them any less, we just aren’t inclined to give that much of ourselves away. Meanwhile, as a Brit on an American chat show, it’s difficult to endure prolonged whooping without intense, red-faced smirking. It isn’t that one culture is funnier per se, just that comparing the two would be like comparing apples and oranges. In former Vanderbilt English professor Nancy A. Walker’s book, What’s So Funny? Humor in American Culture, Walker expounds upon the origin of the distinctive American â€Å"tall tale†, citing the American pioneers of the Western frontier who would write back to the East Coast telling tales of exaggeration in an attempt to impress the readers of their tales. Edward J. Piacentino wrote that the purview of classic American humor still reaches us through mediums such as The Beverly Hillbillies, or the work of comedian Jeff Foxworthy. America’s unique face of humor stems from multiple factors of American history. Firstly, American humor developed intentionally and in stark contrast to that of the British, just like much of American society. Because of the revolutionary nature of the founding of America, certain values have been instilled in the country’s inhabitants. American culture developed as a volte-face from British culture. Additionally, as Walker presented, the development of American humor and exaggerated â€Å"tall-tales† derives from the geography of the country and the frontier development of it. Those elements of the country’s history laid the groundwork for the America that we know today. That is why we still have much of the same face of humor in America after all these years. Works Cited Colbert, Stephen, and Michael C. Brumm. I Am America (and so Can You!). [New York]: Grand Central Pub., 2007. Print. Harris, George Washington. Sut Lovingood. Yarns Spun by a â€Å"nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool.† Warped and Wove for Public Wear. New York: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1867. Print. Pegg, Simon. â€Å"What Are You Laughing At?† The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 02 Sept. 2007. Web. 08 Nov. 2012. Piacentino, Edward J. The Enduring Legacy of Old Southwest Humor. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2006. Print. Twain, Mark, and Deidre S. Laiken. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York, NY: Baronet /Playmore, 1989. Print. Walker, Nancy A. What’s so Funny?: Humor in American Culture. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998. Print.

Humor in American Literature Essay

American society is unique, and the first of its kind. When Charles Dickens visited the United States he was astounded to see how informal American society was, as is recorded in his travelogue, American Notes For General Circulation. Besides this, it is often said by non-Americans that Americans have coarse senses of humor, or senses of humor that are low-class. The American sense of humor is said to clash with a polarized British one. The informality of American humor is utterly logical based on a theory that American society developed in response to Old-World British and European society. This theme often manifests itself in humorous American literature. Humor in American literature frequently bases itself on a sense of entitlement within the lower class, their flawed and ignorant moral senses, and a caricaturing of American exceptionalism, a theory of American superiority among other nations. American humor hasn’t changed extremely, but rather has maintained the common denominator of the humor of American exceptionalism and has parodied a feeling of individual self-worth that is seemingly intrinsic to Americans of all classes. This subject matter can be found in such works as Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Sut Lovingood: Yarns Spun by a â€Å"Nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool†, by George Washington Harris, and Stephen Colbert’s I am America (and So Can You). Most of George Washington Harris’s work was done in the middle of the nineteenth century. His most famous character is the stereotypical rural farmer, Sut Lovingood. Harris’s Sut Lovingood stories were told from the character’s perspective and were defined by Sut’s heavy â€Å"Appalachian English† accent. His stories were initially published separately in multiple newspapers until Harris compiled the stories in his 1867 book Sut Lovingood: Yarns Spun by a â€Å"Nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool. The book mostly pokes fun at the ignorance and simplicity of the title character. Sut Lovingood dictates the book to a writer. He is unable to write it himself because he is illiterate. He is uneasy about this though. Sut says: â€Å"I don’t like the idear ove yu writin a perduckshun, an’ me a-findin the brains.† (Harris 2) Sut is an immensely simple character, but does not see himself as such. He thinks he has important things to say and that anyone who doesn’t read his book will simply be worse-off for having done so, but in reality his stories mostly consist of folderol. Sut states that he wanted his dedication page to read as such: â€Å"Dedercated wif the symperhtys ove the orthur, to the man ur ‘oman, huever they be, what don’t read this yere book.† (Harris 5) Despite his coming after George Washington Harris, Mark Twain is often hailed as the father of American Humor. Twain’s tales of life on the Mississippi River became the definitive stories of his era. His stories are often about naivetà © and the innocence of childhood, on a superficial level , but on a deeper level they are about ignorance and other shortcomings of adults. Twain’s stories were simultaneously entertaining and critical of society. One of his most famous works of this classification is The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Tom Sawyer is set in a small Missouri town, where the standards for luxury are quite low, and the people easily impressed. The townspeople are awed by the county-Judge Thatcher, a relatively low figure in the governmental hierarchy. When he pays a visit to the town church everyone there bends over backwards to â€Å"show off† and impress him (Twain 38). The people are especially impressed by the fact that there exists a tin roof atop one of the buildings in Judge Thatcher’s town. Tom Sawyer’s Aunt Polly is an excellent caricature of American humor. Despite being the voice of discipline in Tom’s life, Aunt Polly is constantly being fooled by the boy. Among the most well known of the Tom Sawyer stories is the anecdote about doing the chore of whitewashing a fence. Because of his indolent nature, Tom cozens his peers into completing his task for him, unbeknownst to his aunt. After Tom returns from his supposed labor after only a short time, Polly commends him saying, â€Å"Well, I never! There’s no getting round it, you can work when you’re a mind to, Tom†. And she goes on to give Tom a â€Å"lecture upon the added value and flavor a treat took to itself when it came without sin through virtuous effort. And while she closed with a scriptural flourish, he ‘hooked’ a doughnut.† (Twain 26) Not only is Tom able to totally fool his aunt, but he is confident enough in her incompetence that he even snatches an additional snack. She and all of the adults in the story go on to fall for Tom’s wiles on numerous occasions. The more modern Stephen Colbert wrote a book entitled I Am America (and So Can You), which bears many similarities to George Washington Harris’s book. Colbert’s work is written from the character on his satirical news show’s extremely traditional, right wing perspective. He spoofs the idea of a traditional American family, going so far as to say that anything falling short of his expectations is simply wrong. He remarks on the role of a good, traditional mother: â€Å"A good mother cooks, cleans, drives, organizes charity events so her children earn community service points for college, and expects nothing in return except love and breakfast in bed one day a year.† (Colbert 9), and he lambasts the idea of one-parent families saying, â€Å"â€Å"If you ask me, from time immemorial, the word ‘family’ has meant only one thing: a Mom married to a Pop and raising 2.3 rambunctious little scamps.† (Colbert 5) Colbert is joking of course, but his implications are that the traditional American standards have room for adjustment and that many conservative Americans are overly hidebound. He goes on to lampoon the institution of religion. â€Å"Religion is the cornerstone of civilization. Without it, we would have no laws, no morality, no social structure, and no guidelines for furnishing our tabernacles.† Many people have tried to pinpoint exactly what it is so distinctive between American and British humor. British comedian Simon Pegg wrote about in the UK Guardian in his 2007 article, â€Å"What Are You Laughing At?†: Americans can fully appreciate irony. They just don’t feel entirely comfortable using it on each other, in case it causes damage. A bit like how we feel about guns. It’s not so much about having a different sense of humour as a different approach to life. More demonstrative than we are, Americans are not embarrassed by their emotions. They clap louder, cheer harder and empathise more unconditionally. It’s an openness that always leaves me feeling slightly guilty and apologetic when American personalities appear on British chat shows and find their jokes and stories met with titters, not guffaws, or their achievements met with silent appreciation, rather than claps and yelps. We don’t like them any less, we just aren’t inclined to give that much of ourselves away. Meanwhile, as a Brit on an American chat show, it’s difficult to endure prolonged whooping without intense, red-faced smirking. It isn’t that one culture is funnier per se, just that comparing the two would be like comparing apples and oranges. In former Vanderbilt English professor Nancy A. Walker’s book, What’s So Funny? Humor in American Culture, Walker expounds upon the origin of the distinctive American â€Å"tall tale†, citing the American pioneers of the Western frontier who would write back to the East Coast telling tales of exaggeration in an attempt to impress the readers of their tales. Edward J. Piacentino wrote that the purview of classic American humor still reaches us through mediums such as The Beverly Hillbillies, or the work of comedian Jeff Foxworthy. America’s unique face of humor stems from multiple factors of American history. Firstly, American humor developed intentionally and in stark contrast to that of the British, just like much of American society. Because of the revolutionary nature of the founding of America, certain values have been instilled in the country’s inhabitants. American culture developed as a volte-face from British culture. Additionally, as Walker presented, the development of American humor and exaggerated â€Å"tall-tales† derives from the geography of the country and the frontier development of it. Those elements of the country’s history laid the groundwork for the America that we know today. That is why we still have much of the same face of humor in America after all these years. Works Cited Colbert, Stephen, and Michael C. Brumm. I Am America (and so Can You!). [New York]: Grand Central Pub., 2007. Print. Harris, George Washington. Sut Lovingood. Yarns Spun by a â€Å"nat’ral Born Durn’d Fool.† Warped and Wove for Public Wear. New York: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1867. Print. Pegg, Simon. â€Å"What Are You Laughing At?† The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 02 Sept. 2007. Web. 08 Nov. 2012. Piacentino, Edward J. The Enduring Legacy of Old Southwest Humor. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2006. Print. Twain, Mark, and Deidre S. Laiken. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York, NY: Baronet /Playmore, 1989. Print. Walker, Nancy A. What’s so Funny?: Humor in American Culture. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1998. Print.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Methods for Reducing Child Abuse - 1506 Words

Nowadays, children are suffering from many physical, psychological and mental complications which is a result of neglecting their rights to live a normal childhood without being exploited. Many children across the globe are exposed to various types of child abuse whether physically, verbally, sexually or even psychologically.AS the illiteracy rates are increasing widely many people do not understand child abuse as a problem. In general, child abuse means the child maltreatment in any form which may lead to childhood serious injuries and fatalities. The problem is rising without any strong attempts to stop it and it is passing from one generation to the other leading to the deprivation of children from happy or cheerful childhood. According to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2013 . About 30% of abused and neglected children will later abuse their own children, continuing the horrible cycle of abuse. Basically, the problem is caused by the spreading of poverty, stress, f amily isolation and of course the lack of awareness of the problem. There are some fatal dangers and risks that result from such a major problem which can affect the whole society as for example the sexual child abuse may result in teen pregnancy and spread of sexual diseases among people. Also, physically abused children may show violent behavior with other children in the schools which may lead to serious consequences. There are many different sectors involved in the problem mainly children,Show MoreRelatedEffects Of Childhood Sexual Abuse On Children1282 Words   |  6 PagesSexual Abuse is dependent in many ways depending on the type of and severity of the abuse. Some of these factors include: age of child when abuse first occurred, how long the abuse lasted, developmental stage of the child, relationship of the abuse to the child, whether forces was used to ensure the child’s participation, degree of shame or guilt experienced by the child, reaction of the child parent( s) and other professionals and other professionals if and when the child reveals the abuse or it isRead MoreThe Social Problem Of Family Violence And Abuse844 Words   |  4 Pagesproblem I decided to discuss is the subject of family violence and abuse, which includes spouses and children. Now, as Ember and Ember explain in the text, in order to deal with violence within families, we must first decide on what should be classified as abuse and what is not (Ember Ember, pg. 230). The word abuse can have various definitions across cultures, as not everyone thinks of it in the same way. To some, hitting a child is a perfectly acceptable form of punishment and of wife- beatingRead MoreThe Statistics Of Prevalence For Child Sex Abuse Essay1483 Words   |  6 PagesThe statistics of prevalence for child sex abuse varies because of all the unique cases of child sex abuse that is reported. Although, statistic show that one in three girls will be sexually abused at one point in the United States and boys are one in seven to be sexually abused (Anderson, 2014). Children are not susceptible to crime as shown in the statistics because predators like pedophiles have fetishes towards little boy or girls. One study found that 10% of children experienced or came closeRead MoreAn Analysis of Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison1217 Words   |  5 Pagesself-satisfied with herself. She doesn t appreciate who she is physically. She constantly thinks she is the most homely and dull person who causes the most inconvenience in the family. This sense of selflessness is mainly due to the physical and sexual abuse brought upon by Daddy Glen, Bone s stepfather. Unfortunately, the assaults were stretched out over a long period of time, leaving little chance for Bone to recover as an adult if any at all. I decided to take a more scientific approach to discussingRead MoreEssay on Bastard Out of Carolina1209 Words   |  5 Pagesself-satisfied with herself. She doesn’t ap preciate who she is physically. She constantly thinks she is the most homely and dull person who causes the most inconvenience in the family. This sense of selflessness is mainly due to the physical and sexual abuse brought upon by Daddy Glen, Bone’s stepfather. Unfortunately, the assaults were stretched out over a long period of time, leaving little chance for Bone to recover as an adult if any at all. I decided to take a more scientific approach to discussingRead MoreThe Effects Of Sexual Abuse On Adolescents And Adults881 Words   |  4 Pagesphysically abusing their child. Aiden received negative messages throughout his childhood and adolescent years and this in turn became a self-fulfilling prophecy. Intervention strategies throughout his life span could have altered the course of the school shooting. Childhood Experiences Aiden experienced emotional abuse from his father throughout his childhood. Kent and Waller (1998 p393) argues† that emotional abuse is the â€Å"core† issue in childhood trauma.† The impact of this abuse is related to psychologicalRead MoreThe Key Aspects Of The Relationship Between Poverty And The Greater Economic Hardship1514 Words   |  7 Pagesbetween abuse and neglect and the greater economic hardship which will have an impact on poverty and how this affects the chance of a child being abused or neglected. Looking at the evidence it is clear to see that there is a strong link associated between poverty and a child suffering from abuse and neglect. Introduction and context According to NSPCC there are more than 50,000 children in the UK are abused and neglected annually, this estimates that there are 8 children suffering abuse for everyRead MoreSuffering of the Innocent: Child Abuse1567 Words   |  7 Pages One in four females and one in six males will be sexually abused before his or her 18th birthday (Nojadera 21). These staggering statistics illuminate the issue of child abuse as one of the most profound problems in society. The astonishingly high rate of maltreatment occurrences at an early age makes one wonder why the topic is not addressed more often. Often going unnoticed by everyone around them, children are enduring unimaginable suffering every day . Many victims feel completely aloneRead MoreThe National Child Traumatic Stress Network ( Nctsn )1060 Words   |  5 PagesThe National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) was stablished by Congress in 2000 and brings a comprehensive focus to childhood trauma. This network raises the average standard of care and improves access to services for traumatized children, their families and communities throughout the United States. The NCTSN defines trauma‑focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF‑CBT) as an evidenceà ¢â‚¬â€˜based treatment approach that is shown to help children, adolescents, and their caregivers overcome trauma‑relatedRead MoreSubstance Use And Substance Abuse1269 Words   |  6 PagesDescribe your understanding of â€Å"substance use† versus â€Å"substance abuse† and why these concepts should be of concern for child welfare workers (Chapter 6)? Substance use and substance abuse is hazard for anyone associated with the issue. However, it is life changing ordeal for children who life decisions are made by individuals who is suffering from either of these problems. Nonetheless, to understand the severity of substance abuse and substance use is to define each issue and the role it plays in