Friday, November 29, 2019

Tobacco Industry Csr Malaysia Essay Example Essay Example

Tobacco Industry Csr Malaysia Essay Example Paper Tobacco Industry Csr Malaysia Essay Introduction 1. 0 INTRODUCTION Major tobacco firms in Malaysia have begun investing aggressively Corporate Social Responsibility activities to build a positive public image and brand activities via large contributions into social programs nationwide, and to be recognised as contributors to the greater common good. Although CSR is considered as a corporate entity along standards of business ethics, tobacco industry philanthropic activities encounter much criticism and threat of a comprehensive ban on CSR atop present legislations for Tobacco Advertising, Promotion Sponsorship worldwide. Many concerns have been raised over the practice; alleging that the motives behind tobacco industry CSR are to manipulate public perception of responsible marketing practices and gain favourable position for the individual firms in Malaysia. 2. 0 CSR AND ITS STRATEGIC ADVANTAGES Holme and Watts define CSR as an ongoing pledge by corporations to conduct themselves in an ethical manner and contribute to economic gro wth while developing the quality of workforce livelihood and their families, and the overall local community and societies. CSR programs were developed to answer public urges for corporations to advocate ethical, environmental, health and labour regulations. The Sustainability Entrepreneurship Model by Young and Tilley, as shown in Appendix I, comprises of six decisive factors: eco-efficiency, socio-efficiency, eco-effectiveness, socio-effectiveness and sufficiency and ecological equity; for corporate sustainability which adds to the business’s social responsibilities and enhances its effectiveness, bringing higher cost savings and better profit margins. 8% of consumers said they were more likely to purchase from companies that engages in initiatives to develop society. 3. 0 TOBACCO INDUSTRY AND TOBACCO USE IN MALAYSIA Malaysia is a major cigarette-manufacturing showpiece for tobacco transnational corporations operating in the South East Asian region. Among 92 sectors, the to bacco industry ranks 5th with an economic output totaling to RM11. 7 billion or 3% of Malaysia’s GDP. The tobacco industry in Malaysia comprises of large corporations such as British American Tobacco, market share 68%; Japan Tobacco Inc. 17. 7%; and Philip Morris International, 15. 3%. The industry considers itself a vital contributor in developing Malaysia’s socio-economic condition of the rural population. Tobacco is Malaysia’s most largely cultivated non-food crop, with 12,148 hectares and 1,200 hectares of land solely for tobacco cultivation in Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia respectively. The industry’s activities range from tobacco leaf cultivation and curing, tobacco production to marketing and distribution. Tobacco Industry Csr Malaysia Essay Body Paragraphs Records show that more than 190,000 people are employed in the industry, and 120,000 people involved in tobacco farming and curing. Smoking statistics show that 10,000 Malaysians succumb to smoking-related ailments annually, making it the top killers in the country since the 1980s. According to Global Adult Tobacco Survey based in Malaysia, 23. 1% or 4. 75 million adults currently smoke, 43. 9% (4. 64 million) being men and 1. 0% (0. 10 million) women. The study also suggested that the expenditure on manufactures cigarettes cover 3. % of the GDP in 2011, its data showing present smokers using an average of RM 178. 80 monthly on manufactured cigarettes. 4. 0 PRACTICE OF TOBACCO INDUSTRY CSR IN MALAYSIA The industry engages CSR in various methods to achieve maximum public exposure and influence. The common approach of tobacco industry CSR is corporate philanthropy in which the firms provide monetary aids in areas such as culture and arts, education, shelter, social welfare and the envi ronment. In addition, they offer support to government policies and sponsorship of events such as youth smoking prevention programs. Several firms have even established charitable foundations to fund their initiatives, such as the British American Tobacco Foundation which was set up with the aim to obtain and manage funds for education, scientific and other charitable purposes. In conjunction with National Kenaf and Tobacco Board, the foundation has rewarded over 2,000 recipients RM 1. 1 million since its initiation in 2002. Formation of alliances between tobacco firms with non-governmental organizations exist as well. Yayasan Salam Malaysia is a long-term NGO partner of Philip Morris since 2006, both supporting a variety of CSR programs concerning poverty and society’s wellbeing. Their annual partnership had revolved around building information and communication technology (ICT) centres in rural places and providing financial aids for the underprivileged. BAT is also the fir st local tobacco company to publish Social Reports since 2001; these reports highlighting the firms CSR activities conducted year-round, looking forward to aligning itself with other businesses that conduct CSR activities. The company had received the Malaysian Sustainability Reporting Award from the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants for BAT’s efforts in cancer research. 5. 0 CRITICISMS TOWARD TOBACCO INDUSTRY CSR The tobacco industry is one of the most criticised members of the modern business community. Several disputes have arisen worldwide declaring that tobacco industry products are lethal to their consumers, and the CSR activities will be unable to resolve the fundamental contradiction with ethical corporate citizenship. WHO defines tobacco industry tactics utilizing CSR as a tool â€Å"to promote voluntary measures as an effective way to address tobacco control and create an illusion of being a ‘changed’ company and to establish partnerships with health interests. † These charitable campaigns purposefully influence the perception among youths and adults that the tobacco industry is deceitful and guilty for advocating smoking among youths and adults. Tobacco companies’ internal documents have revealed the motives behind industry-sponsored programs, aimed to increase profits and stimulate company investments. It is alleged that by conducting CSR, tobacco firms aim to build favourable views regarding the industry and tobacco issues by demonstrating their responsibility and concern about the wellbeing of consumers and stakeholders. Another tobacco industry goal is to achieve political influence with the intention of obstruct government efforts to regulate tobacco control, as evident in Malaysia. These CSR initiatives also pose as protection against litigations or lawsuits. The sponsorship of tobacco firms in youth anti-smoking campaigns is claimed to be a scheme to access youths for market research, to normalis e brands and to avert success of anti-tobacco campaigns. A report by the British Medical Association stated that tobacco industry CSR as a form of marketing for firms, and as such it should be prohibited under the terms of Article 13 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which calls for Parties to impose a full ban on tobacco advertising, promotion and advertising, including CSR. CSR functions in favour of the industry by creating goodwill with lawmakers and the public, crushing bad publicity for its lethal goods, and resolving conflict from tobacco control advocates. The tobacco-caused death and disease suffered by societies and families contradict the advantages of charity or sponsorship for social interests. Tobacco consumption offers zero merits to the underprivileged, and any financial aid offered by tobacco firms accountable for smoking-related ailments and financial woes of the nation fails to relieve poverty, environmental, or health problems. . 0 POLITICAL ECONOMY AND CONTROL OF TOBACCO IN MALAYSIA Advocacy for tobacco control in Malaysia had begun in the 1970s, with gradual growing initiatives to institute specific legislations to regulate tobacco manufacturing and consumption. Compliant to the FCTC, Malaysia enacts legislation compliant with the FCTC by providing extensive regulation and banning of advertising, promotion and sponsorship. Presently, Malaysia allows tobacco industry CSR, and it has been abused by the industry as a strategic tool to change its public image. Measures to undertake the Malaysian smoking epidemic is inconsistent – from one point of view, the cost of lives and health interests; while the other, the critical consequences of tobacco control on tobacco farmers and alleviating poverty. The Malaysian government is an active shareholder and advocate of tobacco. They are major partners in two of Malaysia’s largest tobacco corporations with direct financial interests in the industry. Major shareholders of BA T and JTI include statutory bodies such as the Skim Amanah Saham Bumiputera, Employees Provident Fund, and Amanah Saham Malaysia, demonstrating the Malaysian state controlled ownership of shares in the tobacco industry. A large number of Bumiputeras partake in tobacco cultivation with Bumiputera partners being of key importance in the ownership of tobacco firms. Corresponding to the government policy to promote foreign investment, BAT, Philip Morris, and R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company have set up their subsidiaries and established manufacturing facilities within the country. 7. 0 CONCLUSION In averting the overall poor public image, weak knowledge regarding individual tobacco firms, and more litigations and restraints, the tobacco industry CSR activities are meant to improve public perception of the industry. CSR activities by tobacco firms purposefully highlight their philanthropic contributions to the society and also promote youth smoking prevention programs. As long as there is absence of major restraints and public criticism, the tobacco industry will continue to operate unreservedly, utilising CSR to promote its â€Å"responsible† marketing practices and to receive favorable ratings for individual firms within the country. The tobacco industry’s public relation efforts may possibly influence Malaysian audiences to develop further resistance against the objections faced by the industry, alleviate jurors’ negative scrutiny toward the industry, and thus deteriorating public or legislative support for tobacco control policies in Malaysia. We will write a custom essay sample on Tobacco Industry Csr Malaysia Essay Example specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Tobacco Industry Csr Malaysia Essay Example specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Tobacco Industry Csr Malaysia Essay Example specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer

Monday, November 25, 2019

History of Libya Essay

History of Libya Essay History of Libya Essay Libya or `The Great Socialist People’s Libyan Jamahiriya` is located in North Africa with a population of 5,871,000 in an area of 1,759,540 sq km. Those 2 pieces of information show just how vast and huge Libya really is as opposed to the number of inhabitants it possesses. The reasons for this along with many other topics such as the history of Libya, its people and its culture, its geographical aspects; including land, agriculture and landscape, as its Economic and structural conditions, Natural resources, the government and political conditions, and significant and recent events, will all be covered in this report. History of Libya Libya is a North African country with an interesting history dating all the way back to the 600’s B.C and possibly even further. Initially, the Berber tribe are thought to be the first inhabitants of the country but Libya has been susceptible to a number of foreign rulers and control, essentially not gaining independence until later years. These groups included the ancient cultures of the Carthaginians, The Romans, the Vandals, the Byzantines, the Greeks, the Phoenicians, and the more recent time rulers, the Italians, The British and The French; all but the main rulers and inhabitants of the country throughout history. Although these groups were in control there are little remains left over, today, from the ancient cultures of the Carthaginians and the Phoenicians to prove that their reign over the country. Moreover, The Romans and the Greeks were the only two groups to do so as they left behind ruins in Leptis Magna and Cyrene to prove their domination over the people of Lib ya. In 600 B.C Greek settlers came into the north-eastern part of the country as that region then became known as Cyrenaica and the North-western region as Tripolitania. The Vandals, a German tribe, captured the region of Tripolitania in 430 A.D. By the 500’s the Byzantine soldiers made their way into the region to gain control over the land and its people. In the 7th century A.D, the religion of Islam was introduced to the country as Arab soldiers gained entry into Libya with help from the weakness of the Berber tribes’ rebellion towards the Byzantine rule. The Arabs were then able to conquer Libya and a more than prevalent amount of Libya’s Native people accepted Islam, The Arab culture and its language. The North-western region of Libya, Tripolitania, and the North-eastern region, Cyrenaica, and the South-western part, Fezzan, became conquered by the Turkish Ottoman in 1551 after they captured the city of Tripoli. Although the Turks gained control over major regions in Libya, the local rulers essentially had entire freedom as Libya became constituent of their empire and an autonomous rule was held over the country by the Turks. Up until 1911, the indigenous people were victorious in resisting colonization as the Italians invaded the country and colonized the state. By 1912, the regions of Fezzan, Tripolitania and Cyrenaica were all taken control of by the Italians. In 1934, the title on â€Å"Libya† was given to the colony as its official name. Initially, the word was used by the Greeks to describe all of North Africa, not including Egypt. Italy began to advocate building plans as they built roads, towns, and water systems for the Libyan people. These improvements to t he country, inevitably, began to bring in copious amounts of European immigrants to work in the new settlement as job opportunities opened up. However, the Libyan resistance to colonial rule did not cease operations, King Idris I of Cyrenaica and his Muslim social reform group, called â€Å"the Sanusi Brotherhood†, established a strong unit against the Italian rule. Accompanying King Idris I and his Sanusi Brotherhood during World War II was the British in Egypt who were also disputing with Italy. By February 1943, Italian rule in Libya was diminished and the British took over the Northern regions in Libya of Tripolitania and Cyrenaica and

Friday, November 22, 2019

An Effective Teacher Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

An Effective Teacher - Essay Example As a flexible educator, an effective teacher makes it a point to improvise tools or innovate techniques which are sensitive to the needs of each student especially when it comes to targeting personal growth in terms of enhanced potentials and increased level of self-worth. While the quantity of lessons may matter with ample significance at anytime, such an instructor does not afford to neglect providing quality in his unique creative style of teaching which naturally earns appreciation by colleagues and pupils alike. An effective teacher exhibits a character of passion toward mastery of specialization or subject being taught. Because it is part of his chief objective to sustain learning with excellence, he finds a way to exceed the standards of his profession and considers exploring knowledge of the yet unknown for the benefit not only of improving his intellect but also of inspiring the students with the wonderful idea of gaining mastery of their individual endeavors both at present and in the future. Students are similarly encouraged to be regularly present in class to listen and perform in a stimulating atmosphere fostered by a teacher who demonstrates skillfulness in classroom management.

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Communications strategy Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

Communications strategy - Essay Example There is the need to highlight the communication measure applied to maintain the market share witnessed over the century and ensure a customer retention and satisfaction as compared to competitors. With variable communication channels developed in the society, including the social networking system, the presentation to deliver an informed clientele would ensure Thomas Pink remains favourable in the UK market. This paper analyzes the fundamental communication channels that have been developed by Thomas Pink to retain and find new customers, who are more informed on their products. Introduction The UK market is growing increasingly in favour of new commodities. The favour has been subjected on the marketers’ ability to apply a communication measure that would adopt the best strategy to communicate to the majority of the clients. The uses of traditional methods have been replaced by the growing technologically advanced systems. The increasing UK market has adopted communication m eans like the social networking systems that are incorporated in the completion of daily activities. Thomas Pink has been one company that has showed their ability to favour progress as they apply modernized operation trends, to maintain a high quality service. Communication is a measure used to relay messages and share methods needed to attain progress as the company ensures the mission and objectives are met. Although the traditional communication channels had been tested to be successful, Thomas Pink has adopted contemporary communication channels to lead to the goal achievement and progress. Company Background The company witnesses the history from the works of Mr Pink, an 18th century designer who tailored a remarkable hunting coat (Synovate Retail Performance, 2008). The pink coat’s design had been unique and involved intricate designs that promised the birth of the famous company, to be witnessed in the modern day century. Thomas Pink’s foundation in the creatio n of the company in 1984 grew to be recognised as part of Moet Hennessy-Luis Vuilton (LVMH) group (Synovate Retail Performance, 2008). The provision to join LVMH had been initiated in 1999 when they had bought an outstanding portion in the business. Thomas pin has since grown to emerge as a leading retail clothing store in the UK and Ireland with stores amounting to over 20 outlets. The company has ever since emerged as an outstanding British company identified through the shirt making tradition with the quality luxurious brand. The British company has gained international growth in establishing outlets in Paris and famous US cities. The most outstanding reports of the growth recorded have been in 16.5 billion turnovers with the recruitment of a record employee number of 71,000 (Synovate Retail Performance, 2008). The company has included famous brands in their stock including Zenith, Krug, Hennessy and other recognized brands. The company stocks affordable attire from shirt, tie an d accessories and finds concrete establishment in the UK. The retail shops are located from London to New York in Madison Avenue where the brand has been established as a leading retail shirt shop. The other provision established by the company had been in the set up of an exclusive women’s store Pink Woman located in Sloane St. Knightsbridge (Synovate Retail Performance, 2008). The reputation of the retail outlet has been boosted in the exemplary fabric choice and

Monday, November 18, 2019

Falcon Computer Company Case Study Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Falcon Computer Company - Case Study Example This essay discusses that discrepancy was largely witnessed as the promotions of the values were not appropriately communicated and enforced in practice by the management. The factors which were largely responsible for the existence of the discrepancy are as follows: 1. Lack of initiative from the management: The higher management was great in formulating the values to be followed by the employees but only formulation was not the very success of it.   2. The confidence among employees was not boosted: The employees were not provided with an opportunity to get the values to be worked across them. At the same time, they felt no space to implement a value and work accordingly. 3. Freedom of speech was lacking on the employee front: â€Å"Attention to detail is our trademark; our goal is to do it right the first time†. However, it was observed that the design flaws caused the main hurdle and in the first place, it needed to be corrected to prevent flaws in the forthcoming steps. 4. Openness was greatly lacking: The culture statement promising to encourage open, direct, person-to-person communication as part of the daily routine was not at all followed in practice. At Falcon, it was more of secrecy than openness. 5. Lack of management participation: Even after the value document was formulated and was expected to be followed, lack of management enforcement was greatly lacking to get the values embedded into the employees. 6. Lack of interest from the Employee side: Lack of interest from the employee side was a turnaround feature in exercising the values. They did not take it seriously and never bothered to come up with valuable suggestions so as to prove that there was an initiative from their side. They have never held the management accountable for the non-compliance of values. They instead have understood what was really emphasized in the organization namely hierarchy, secrecy and expediency. They never moved out of their comfort zone to take a stand. Th e lack of initiative also made the other employees follow the similar notion to take a back seat.

Saturday, November 16, 2019

Self balancing vehicle

Self balancing vehicle 1.Introduction 1.1. Introduction Research on two wheeled, self balancing vehicle is gaining momentum in many laboratories around the world and has made many developments based on it. Balancing carts are defined by their ability to balance on two wheels and spin on the spot similar to an inverted pendulum. It has been the subject of many researches around the world ever since people started investigating the concept of inverted pendulum system. Many forms and functions of a two wheeled cart have been developed and modified, due to its high manoeuvrability, two wheeled balancing cart has been investigated and developed to become a human transport machine. The Segway, Pegasus, and iBot models are such examples of the design of two wheeled balancing robot as a human transport machine. Balancing of a two wheel cart is a non linear control problem which is quite complex to solve in a methodological approach due to two degrees of freedom, i.e. the balancing cart position and angle using only one control input force. The control principle simply involves driving the wheels of the cart in the direction where the body is falling. It has the same principles as balancing a broom stick on the palm of a hand, a person balancing the stick moves the hand in the direction that the stick is falling The scope of this thesis is to design a controller and develop the hardware for the two wheeled cart such that the cart can stay in an upright position while the cart is in a static position or moving. Apart from the above, the thesis will look into the suitability and performance of different types of linear state space controllers namely the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), pole placement controller and state observer design in balancing the system. 1.2. Literature Review The wide application of technology derived from the very concept of inverted pendulum has lead to many researches being carried out by many researchers and robot enthusiasts around the world. This chapter provides a review on some vital topics related to the balancing of a two wheeled robot as well as some of the existing human transporters, 1.2.1. Segway The Segway PT is a two-wheeled, self-balancing electric vehicle invented by Dean Kamen. It is produced by Segway Inc. of New Hampshire, USA. The working of the Segway is based on a new technology termed dynamic stabilization, i.e. it uses the bodys movement to enable the Segway to perform its function. For instance, to move forward or backward, the rider has to lean in the required direction, similarly, for left-right movement, the Leansteer frame is turned in the required direction. The dynamics of Segway PT are also based on the concept of the inverted pendulum. It consists of electric motors powered by Valence Technology and phosphate based lithium ion batteries, two tilt sensors and 5 gyroscopes. The servo drive motors rotate the wheels forward or backwards as needed for balance or propulsion. 1.2.2. Self Balancing Scooter Trevor Blackwell built a self-balancing scooter similar to the Segway HT that was completed in 2002. There are two models of the scooter built by Trevor Blackwell and the control system of the vehicle are summarized below, Model 1: The scooter is powered by Remote Control (RC) car battery packs. The packs provide a power source that can support the high discharge rate demanded by the motors. The control system of the vehicle is run from an 8-bit Atmel microcontroller using Proportional Derivative (PD) control with feedback from a piezo electric rate gyroscope. The gain parameters can be tuned by hand while actually using the vehicle. The motors are controlled by the Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals from the motor driver. Steering is done by making one wheel go faster than the other. Because all the mass is centered between the wheels, it can spin around quite quickly. The steering system adds and subtracts a small percentage of power from the motors depending on the current speed of the vehicle Model 2: This model is an improvisation of the first model. It is designed to be much smoother, lighter and faster than the first model. Roboteq dual channel motor controller used in the first model is replaced with an OSMC (Open Source Motor Controller) driving each wheel independently. The OSMC can supply from 13V to 50V at 160A continuous and 400A peak while the major advantage stems from the processing time which is in the order of one or two milliseconds compared to tens of milliseconds with the previously used Roboteq motor controller. The gyroscope system used in the first model is replaced with a gyroscope/accelerometer assembly that has significantly less noise and less susceptible to vibrations. This model includes a Bluetooth connection such that the scooter can be driven remotely while balancing. 1.2.3. JOE le Pendule Felix, Grasser (2002) built a revolutionary two-wheeled vehicle called the JOE. It consists of two coaxial wheels with each wheel coupled to a DC motor. This configuration enables the vehicle to do stationary U-turns. The control system consists of two state space controllers which drives the motors so as to keep the system in equilibrium while in motion. In order to reduce cost as well as danger for the test pilots a scaled down prototype carrying a weight instead of a driver was built (Grasser et al). The implemented control system is the pole placement control. JOEs performance can be further enhanced by varying the pole placement in real time depending on the states and inputs of the system. The implementation of these controllers can be seen in papers published by Nakajima et al. (1997), Shiroma et al. (1996), Takahashi et al. (2001) and Grasser et al (2002). 1.2.4 LegWay EquiBot Steve Hassenplugs Lego based LegWay uses two Electro-Optical Proximity Detectors to balance and detect and follow lines. This robot uses Infrared Proximity detectors to deduce the tilt angle of the robot. Another robot similar to the Legway is the Equibot by Dan Piponi. Equibot is a balancing robot which is like a small scale segway. It is based around an ATMega32 RISC Microcontroller. It has just one sensor: the Sharp infrared ranger. This is positioned facing downwards to measure distance to the floor and as a result tilt angle is obtained. The output from this device is used to decide which way the robot is leaning and hence stabilize the system. 1.2.5 nBot Balancing Robot The nBot balancing robot by David P.Anderson is another two wheeled balancing robot that has been developed in the recent past, the concept of balancing this robot could be applied to this two wheeled balancing cart project, for the nBot the wheels are driven in such a way as to stay under the robots center of gravity, hence, the robot remains balanced. The nbot consists of two feedback sensors: a tilt or angle sensor to measure the tilt of the robot with respect to gravity, and also consist of encoders on the wheels in order to measure the position of the base of the robot. The position and motion of an inverted pendulum based machine such as the nBot are defined by four variables. They are the position, the velocity, the tilt angle and the tilt rate. The measurements from these four variables are summed and fed back as a motor voltage which is proportional to torque, hence is used to balance and drive the robot. 1.2.6 EDGAR A student project at the University of Adelaide under the guidance of Dr.Ben Cazzolato resulted in EDGAR, the Electro-Drive Grav-Aware Ride. EDGARs design draws up the successes and failures of the Segway PT and various other attempts of producing self balancing scooters which use different automatic control methods. Angular feedbacks from the gyroscopic sensor and PWM output to motors are used in a control system to achieve balance in EDGAR. The microcontroller used is the Wytec MiniDRAGON+ development board; the microcontroller receives the information from sensors, interprets the information and then sends commands to drive the system to maintain balance.

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Free Macbeth Essays: Appearance and Reality :: GCSE Coursework Macbeth Essays

Appearance and Reality in Macbeth Appearance does not always agree with reality. A limited view on an event or a subject will likely lead to a limited or even false conclusion. For example, in Shakespeare’s tragic play Macbeth, the Scottish nobles viewed main character Macbeth as a "bloody tyrant"; for the readers, Macbeth is not total evil character, but nearly a hero with much physical strength and greatness. Only if he didn’t betray his king, he would’ve been a great thane. This essay is going to be dealt with this difference in appearance and reality of Macbeth Macbeth is a deranged, old man with flashes of former greatness. He came into the play as a man of honor respected by his fellow soldiers, and has shown great bravery and physical strength, fighting under King Duncan. As reported by the bloody general "Disdaining fortune, with his brandished steel†¦smoked with bloody execution†¦carved out his passage†¦fixed his head upon our battlement." (I, ii, 15-25) From this quote we can image Macbeth’s heroic qualities: courage, bravery and unstoppable. King Duncan greatly praised Macbeth for the Bravery and Loyalty, but what he didn’t see from Macbeth’s face (Appearance) is the dark desire of Macbeth who is planning to murder the king (reality). From this point on, as the witches’ prophecies come in and Macbeth’s ambition aided by Lady Macbeth, this heroic character in both the reader’s mind and Scottish noble’s mind started its downfall. After the murdered King Duncan, quoted from Banquo "†¦and I fear thou play’dst most foully for ’t." (III, I, 3) all Scottish nobles are suspicious about Macbeth of murdering King Duncan. Ever after, Macbeth seems to believe in his philosophy "things bad begun make strong themselves by ill", (III, iii, 55) and try to cover up his murder by killing more and more. At last, his ambition drove him from a hero to a tyrant that "blisters†¦tongues" (VI, iii, 10-15) Flashbacks of Macbeth’s greatness once again reappear at the end of his tragic story in the speech "tomorrow, and tomorrow and tomorrow†¦." (V, v, 15-30) Through this speech we can feel his sadness and rage toward his meaningless life "life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hours upon stage, and then is heard no more." When Macbeth realized the prophecies of his crisis coming, he said "if this which he avouches does appear,/there is nor flying hence nor tarrying here. Free Macbeth Essays: Appearance and Reality :: GCSE Coursework Macbeth Essays Appearance and Reality in Macbeth Appearance does not always agree with reality. A limited view on an event or a subject will likely lead to a limited or even false conclusion. For example, in Shakespeare’s tragic play Macbeth, the Scottish nobles viewed main character Macbeth as a "bloody tyrant"; for the readers, Macbeth is not total evil character, but nearly a hero with much physical strength and greatness. Only if he didn’t betray his king, he would’ve been a great thane. This essay is going to be dealt with this difference in appearance and reality of Macbeth Macbeth is a deranged, old man with flashes of former greatness. He came into the play as a man of honor respected by his fellow soldiers, and has shown great bravery and physical strength, fighting under King Duncan. As reported by the bloody general "Disdaining fortune, with his brandished steel†¦smoked with bloody execution†¦carved out his passage†¦fixed his head upon our battlement." (I, ii, 15-25) From this quote we can image Macbeth’s heroic qualities: courage, bravery and unstoppable. King Duncan greatly praised Macbeth for the Bravery and Loyalty, but what he didn’t see from Macbeth’s face (Appearance) is the dark desire of Macbeth who is planning to murder the king (reality). From this point on, as the witches’ prophecies come in and Macbeth’s ambition aided by Lady Macbeth, this heroic character in both the reader’s mind and Scottish noble’s mind started its downfall. After the murdered King Duncan, quoted from Banquo "†¦and I fear thou play’dst most foully for ’t." (III, I, 3) all Scottish nobles are suspicious about Macbeth of murdering King Duncan. Ever after, Macbeth seems to believe in his philosophy "things bad begun make strong themselves by ill", (III, iii, 55) and try to cover up his murder by killing more and more. At last, his ambition drove him from a hero to a tyrant that "blisters†¦tongues" (VI, iii, 10-15) Flashbacks of Macbeth’s greatness once again reappear at the end of his tragic story in the speech "tomorrow, and tomorrow and tomorrow†¦." (V, v, 15-30) Through this speech we can feel his sadness and rage toward his meaningless life "life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hours upon stage, and then is heard no more." When Macbeth realized the prophecies of his crisis coming, he said "if this which he avouches does appear,/there is nor flying hence nor tarrying here.